Marine Hot Water Heaters Blog Dept: 5 Great Ways to Prep Your Boat for Hurricane Season

Marine Hot Water Heaters Blog Dept: 5 Great Ways to Prep Your Boat for Hurricane Season

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Take Action to Protect Your Boat During the Upcoming Hurricane Season

Raritan Engineering Company your marine hot water heaters specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding prepping your boat for hurricane season. 
Will you have a recreational boat located in hurricane country as of June 1? Your marine hot water heaters experts talk about how according to recently released predictions by experts at Colorado State University, the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season could be a doozy. 
1. Who pays for salvage? When a hurricane throws your boat across the boatyard into a big pile, sinks it in the slip, or carries it into a football field end zone, you end up with a salvage situation. If the boat is not a total loss and needs to be recovered and brought to a repair facility, salvage costs can escalate quickly. Most boaters assume that the cost of raising or moving a damaged boat to a safe location – salvage coverage – is included in their insurance policy. And with better policies that’s true: They offer salvage coverage that is separate but equal to the boat’s hull coverage limit. 
2. You can lower your “named storm deductible” by preparing. “Storm deductibles,” which increase your deductible for boat damages incurred in a named storm, are common with recreational boat insurance policies today. One way to reduce the deductible is to make active preparations when a storm approaches, such as hauling the boat, lashing the boat to the ground, and removing any windage items such as enclosures, canvas and/or sails. 

Do You Live In Hurricane Territory? Have No Fear With These Ways to Stay Safe

3. Know your hurricane haulout coverage, and use it if you have to. For boats in hurricane zones, “hurricane haulout coverage,” also sometimes known as “named storm haulout reimbursements,” is a must. This coverage helps pay boat owners a portion of the labor costs to have a boat hauled, prepared and tied-down by professionals, which include marina or boat club staff, or to have the boat moved by a licensed captain. 
4. Is your boat trailer insured? Not all boat insurance policies cover boat trailers as a separate item, so if a hurricane topples a tree onto your boat trailer breaking it in half, ensure it’s covered. Your insurance company should know the cost of the trailer separate from the boat’s value.
5. A heads up if you have a liability-only boat policy. Some boaters choose liability-only insurance. That can meet their needs just fine, but ensure that it also includes coverage for salvage and wreck removal, and that separate coverage is available for fuel-spill incidents. 
So don’t forget these great tips for prepping your boat for the upcoming hurricane season. 1) Make sure you have salvage coverage on your insurance;  2) know your hurricane haulout coverage;  and 3) be well prepared, do your homework regarding safety and all insurance coverages.

Sailing Maori Journey, New Zealanders Rekindle Indigenous Pride

Check out our marine water heaters selection here at Raritan Engineering and see how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.
Some, holding Samoan flags, made a beeline for the waka Gaualofa. At the head of the vessel was Fealofani Bruun, a 32-year-old female captain whom many – particularly “Moana” fans – had come to see.
His own waka, the Haunui, circumnavigaes New Zealand spreading a message of environmental conservation. Mr. Barclay-Kerr said the sight of a waka sailing into the bay often awakened memories among older Maori people of oral histories they had learned as children.
“Often they’re not confident enough to talk about it until the waka arrive, because people tell them, ‘Ah, it’s just a story,’ ” he said.
Turned down for the navy, Mr. Dice joined a yacht squadron and then the Coast Guard in the hope that he would learn to sail, but it was the waka that provided the opportunity he sought. He was now preparing for a voyage to Hawaii on the double-hulled canoe in 2020.

A version of this article appears in print on March 15, 2018, on Page A12 of the New York edition with the headline: Sailing Into a New Zealand Harbor, and Recreating History.
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Author: mslrmss

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