Daily Archives: Thursday, May 24, 2018

  • Marine Heads Dept.Blog: Simple Ways to Stay Safe While Boating

     safety tips

    Try These Easy and Cost Effective Ways to Stay Safe While Boating

    Raritan Engineering Company your marine heads specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding simple ways to stay safe while boating. 
    Your marine heads experts talk about how to open up your boat for a vessel safety check: You may think getting a vessel safety check from the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary or U.S. Power Squadrons can open yourself to problems. However, a no-risk, free vessel safety check does the opposite. It points out both the required and recommended items to have aboard, such as fire extinguishers, life jackets, distress signals, first-aid kits, and engine spark arrestors.
    Believe the numbers – take a safety course: Statistics from the U.S. Coast Guard Office of Boating Safety show that only 13 percent of all boating deaths in 2016 occurred on vessels where the operator had taken a nationally approved boating safety education course.
    Give a safety talk before you head out: Taking out guests is half the fun of boating, but before you head out give a little talk about how to stay safe aboard your boat. Some important things to include may be how to distribute weight in a small boat, how to hold on when crossing a wake, how a tuber or water skier should safely reboard after being towed, how the VHF radio works and the location of important safety equipment.
    Be Weather-Wise
    Always check local weather conditions before departure; TV and radio forecasts can be a good source of information. If you notice darkening clouds, volatile and rough changing winds or sudden drops in temperature, play it safe by getting off the water.

    Safety Doesn’t Always Have to Be Expensive

    Browse our selection of marine heads here at Raritan Engineering, where we always take care of your marine sanitation and supply needs.
    Follow a Pre-Departure Checklist
    Proper boating safety includes being prepared for any possibility on the water. Following a pre-departure checklist is the best way to make sure no boating safety rules or precautions have been overlooked or forgotten.
    Use Common Sense
    One of the most important parts of boating safety is to use your common sense. This means operating at a safe speed at all times (especially in crowded areas), staying alert at all times and steering clear of large vessels and watercraft that can be restricted in their ability to stop or turn. Also, be respectful of buoys and other navigational aids, all of which have been placed there to ensure your own safety.
    Develop a Float Plan
    Whether you choose to inform a family member or staff at your local marina, always be sure to let someone else know your float plan. This should include where you’re going and how long you’re going to be gone.
    Avoid Alcohol
    Practice boating safety at all times by saving the alcohol for later. The probability of being involved in a boating accident doubles when alcohol is involved and studies have shown that the effects of alcohol are exacerbated by sun and wind.
    Learn to Swim
    If you’re going to be in and around the water, proper boating safety includes knowing how to swim. Local organizations, such as the American Red Cross and others, offer training for all ages and abilities. Check to see what classes are offered in your area.
    So don’t forget these great tips for keeping your and your family safe while out on the water. 1) Take a safety course;  2) be weather wise;  and 3) use common sense.

    Centuries-old sailing ship found on Florida beach

    A 48-foot section of an old sailing ship has washed ashore on a Florida beach, thrilling researchers who are rushing to study it before it’s reclaimed by the sea. 
    At first, Turner thought it was a piece of a pier or fence, but then, she realized it was a centuries-old ship that had washed ashore. 
    “We walked and checked it out and immediately knew it was a historical piece of artifact,” she said. Researchers with the St. Augustine Lighthouse and Maritime Museum have been documenting the artifact and say it could date back as far as the 1700s.  
    “To actually see this survive and come ashore. This is very, very rare. This is the holy grail of shipwrecks,” Anthony said. 
    Museum historian Brendan Burke told the newspaper that evidence suggests the vessel was once sheeted in copper, and that crews found Roman numerals carved on its wooden ribs.
    Buy a marine head here at Raritan Engineering and see how we provide you the best products in the marine sanitation industry today.

    Be sure to watch our latest video on marine heads below.