Daily Archives: Friday, March 23, 2018

  • Marine Toilet Dept. Blog: Proper Sailing Etiquette For Rookies

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    What Does Proper Etiquette Involve For You? 

    Raritan Engineering Company your marine toilet specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding proper sailing etiquette for rookies. 
    Your marine toilet professionals talk about the etiquette of sailing involves the proper and traditional ways of conducting yourself on a boat and the rules for sailing and interacting with other boats.
    Ask Permission to Board
    Before you even try to climb onto a boat, find the skipper or crew and ask for permission. The correct way to ask for permission is to say, “Permission to come aboard?” This is one of the most essential rules of etiquette for sailing and is used when you want to become a guest on another boat.
    Don’t Pack Too Much, Pack Smart
    While packing for your sailing trip, keep in mind that you will have limited personal space and storage areas for the items that you bring. The more items that you bring, the less room there will be to move around and enjoy your surroundings. It is important to only pack the essentials plus one or two creature comforts that will make your trip more pleasant. For clothing, keep the general weather in mind and only bring the bare minimum. 
    Be Safe and Keep Others Safe
    Safety is critical while on a sailboat, as there is no local emergency service department to come to your aid within a moment’s notice. Because sailboats are limited in space, there is only so much protective and safety gear that can be brought aboard.
    See your choice of marine toilets here at Raritan Engineering and see how we always take care of your marine sanitation supply needs.
    Bring Something for Everyone
    Whether you’re the host or a guest, it’s common courtesy to bring gifts for others on board. When you are the host of a sailing trip, it is a common pleasantry to bring something to share with everyone, such as breakfast. As a guest, it is also a common courtesy to bring a gift for the host and for the other guests. 
    If You’re a Guest, Offer to Buy Fuel
    When you are a guest on another sailboat and were invited to go on the trip, it is appropriate to offer to buy fuel. Ask the host while you are still at the marina if you could pay for the fuel that the boat needs before leaving the dock. You could also offer to pay for the fuel at the next fueling station. Offering to pay for the boat’s fuel is a simple way to show your appreciation to the host who invited you to come along.
    Ask to Use the Head
    Ask to use the “head” before using it. The “head”, also known as the boat’s toilet, requires proper operating instructions so that you do not accidentally cause a clog or overflow. Be sure to not discard excessive amounts of toilet paper, as this may cause a clog. 
    Don’t Be Messy
    With the limited amount of space on the sailboat, keeping everything in its proper place is essential to everyone’s safety and comfort. Avoid making a mess. If a mess does happen, take the time to clean it up properly. If a liquid has spilled, keep everyone out of the area until you clean it. 
    So don’t forget these great tips for showing proper etiquette while sailing. 1) Ask permission to board;  2) don’t pack too much, pack smart;  3) bring something for everyone;  and 4) if you’re a guest, offer to buy fuel.

    88-Yr-Old Has Lived on a Cruise Ship For the Past 10 Years

    Have you ever taken a vacation that was so great you never wanted to leave? What if you could figure out a way to stay there for the rest of your life?
    For Lee Wachtstetter, that vacation was aboard the Crystal Serenity cruise ship, and she has it all figured out.
    “I started frequent cruising. But I got very, very tired of packing and unpacking. So I said, there’s got to be a better way to do this,” Wachtstetter explained.
    Mama lee has already experienced the hardship of raising children and traveling. She aims to spend her twilight years relaxing.
    “Everything is ‘Been there, done that.’ If I’ve been there and done that, I don’t go off the ship,” she explained.
    “And I love it when everybody goes touring. I got the whole ship to myself with all the help.”
    For about $175,000 a year, Wachtstetter cruises around to tropical locations without a care in the world. “I think I live a fairy tale existence,” she admitted.
    Mama Lee has written a memoir titled “I May Be Homeless, But You Should See My Yacht,” documenting her life of luxurious travels. “It’s not a real life, I realize that. Not everybody does this. But a lot of people could.”
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