Daily Archives: Wednesday, February 15, 2017

  • Marine Toilets Dept: Fishing Safely Near Breakers, Boating Tips



    Our Marine Toilets Dept Discusses: Fishing Safely Near Breakers, Boating Tips

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    Your marine toilets experts here at Raritan Engineering know that saltwater game fish often hunt where the ocean surge meets the shore.

    The surging turbulence where ocean waves careen into the shallows creates rich hunting areas for game fish such as calico bass, redfish, roosterfish, striped bass and tarpon. Your marine toilets specialists say that despite the dangers, boating anglers have found methods to get close and pull fish from under the menacing waves and foam. I talked to a few veteran anglers to glean six principles for fishing successfully and safely near the pounding surf.


    If in Doubt, Stay Out

    Stay away from the breaking waves when conditions are too gnarly. “If the swells are big, I steer clear of shore rocks,” says Capt. Benny Florentino, a guide and tournament angler who regularly braves Pacific swells in pursuit of calico bass ranging up to 9 pounds in the rocky shallows off Southern California.

    Capt. Greg Hildreth, who guides guests to big redfish and tarpon amid the wave-swept shoals of the Georgia coast aboard his 20-foot Action Craft bay boat, echoes that sentiment. “If you see big breakers blowing through – any thing bigger than 4 feet – it’s time to go elsewhere.”

    Despite being on opposite coasts, both Florentino and Hildreth believe in observing each spot from a safe distance before moving in. “I might watch a spot for 15 or 20 minutes to see what the wave patterns are like,” says Florentino. “This gives me an idea of how to fish it safely on any given day, but some days I just drive away, because no fish is worth risking lives.”

    Breaking swells can quickly turn shore waters into danger zones for boating anglers.


    Plan an Exit Strategy

    Even after evaluating a spot, a set of big waves can still roll in unexpectedly. So plan in advance how you’re going to escape. Running straight out, trying to get over a wave before it breaks can lead to catastrophe, according to Hildreth, who anchors his boat outside the breakers to fish.

    “If I see a rogue swell coming, a wave that might break early, I crank up the motor and attack the swell at an angle,” he says. “I don’t even bring in the anchor, because there’s no time, but rather pull it behind as we’re heading out.” In quartering the wave, the boat is less likely to get pitched over backward or crash down hard on the backside.

    “It’s often better to run in a bit, and then turn and aim for the ‘shoulder’ of the wave where the water is deeper and the wave’s not breaking,” explains Erik Landesfeind, who fishes for California’s calico bass from an 18-foot Blazer Bay boat.

    Your marine toilets analyst suggest that when fishing on the inshore side of a “boiler” rock or shoal, the best tactic is sometimes to do nothing. “Let the wave break outside of you and disperse its energy,” Landesfeind advises. “Then all you have to deal with is the more-gentle shore wash.”


    Keep the Big Motor Running

    Some anglers like to work jetties and shore rocks with a bow-mounted trolling motor. Yet, when fishing around breakers, you should leave the trolling motor up and keep the big motor running, if you’re not anchoring, according to Landesfeind. “A lot of young guys charge in to fish, and drop in their trolling motor and turn off the big motor, and that’s a big mistake,” he says.

    It’s also imperative to keep the bow pointed away from shore, sometimes backing into a spot, so the boat tends to ride up and over an incoming swell, and is always headed in the right direction if you have to move out quickly. By all means, avoid leaving the boat sideways to a breaking wave, a scenario that can lead to capsizing.

    Veteran captains often fish from the helm, so they’re ready to pilot the boat to safety at a moment’s notice. All have learned from close calls in the past.

    Fish close to rocky outcroppings only when sea conditions allow you to do so safely.


    Buddy Up

    It’s a bad idea to fish dangerous areas solo; at least one person needs to be focused on boat handling. “When we’re fishing close to shore, I’m 90 percent skipper, constantly looking over my shoulder,” Landesfeind explains. “That allows the other guy to be 90 percent angler, focusing on likely pockets and ripping off long casts.”

    This division of responsibilities is critical because it’s easy for an angler to become fixated on fishing, particularly when trying to land a fish. Having a skipper on alert helps prevent lapses of awareness “While my guests are fishing, I’m always keeping my eyes peeled for danger,” says Hildreth.

    Always remain alert to possible dangers when fishing around jetties and breakwaters.


    Communicate

    Effective communication between the angler and crew keeps everyone alert and helps prevent injuries. It starts with encouraging crew to speak up if they see a big wave from a distance. But the skipper also needs to be clear when it’s time to run for safety.

    “When I shout, ‘We’re going,” that means sit down and hold onto something,” says Capt. Jimmy Decker, a guide and tournament angler who fishes Southern California shores from an Everglades 243 bay boat with a 250 hp Suzuki outboard. Often, there’s no time to reel in or move about before the skipper accelerates; hence the need to get low and find a handle.

    Hildreth, who likes to drift baits back into the surf zone, instructs his guests to remain seated when they are not fighting a fish, as the waves off the Georgia coast can jostle them around at any time. “Plus, that way, they’re already seated if I have to punch out in a hurry,” he adds.


    Wear a Life Jacket

    Among the anglers I interviewed, only one professed to wearing a life jacket while fishing in risky shore areas, yet all admitted that it was a good idea. Suspender-style inflatable life jackets allow for great mobility while fishing, and models that automatically inflate upon contact with water ensure that an angler will remain afloat, even if rendered unconscious – a critical safety feature for all boating anglers, whether fishing in the danger zone or staying well offshore.

    Click here and see how Raritan Engineering always has more information regarding marine toilets and all of your marine supply needs.

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  • Marine Sanitation Hoses: “What’s That Smell?



    Marine Sanitation Hoses

    Marine Sanitation Hose:

    Odors from a boat’s sanitation system can originate from many sources:

    Inlet hose and bowl rim: Organic matters from sea water inlet into the toilet can disintegrate and emit rotten egg smell from the flush water.

    Holding tank gases can find its way into a boats interior either thru the toilet or the vent system.

    Consider just starting here to make things simple…

    Hose permeation is a most common cause of odors from sanitation system. Choosing a correct hose for new installation or replacement is important for making system odor free for several years of use. Most commonly used hoses material include PVC, EPDM rubber and Butyl rubber.

    Rubber hoses are better for low permeability compared to PVC and hence have longer warranties. Butyl rubber has better resistance against oils compared to EPDM. Both EPDM and butyl have better resistance to Alcohol used in winterization than PVC hose.

    While choosing sanitation hose consider following:

    1.     Long life: Raritan  Sani/Flex Odor Shield has a special white butyl rubber compound, to stop sewage odor from escaping the hose. It is 15 times more resistant to odor permeation than standard PVC hose, and carries a 5 year warranty against odor permeation

    marine sanitation hose

    2.     Ease of installation: Sani/Flex Odor Shield hose is extremely flexible. It will bend on a radius of 3.15″ without kinking. It can easily be installed on standard hose barb fittings without excessive effort, with no need to heat or lubricate the hose. These are major benefits for all installation mechanics who have spent long, difficult periods of time wrestling with other brands of sanitation hose

    3.     Strength against collapsing and pressure: Sani/Flex Odor Shield hose is reinforced. It contains a double steel wire helix reinforcement imbedded in the butyl rubber, plus a synthetic textile yarn, to resist bursting from high pressure and/or clogs at fittings. It is rated for 315 PSI burst pressure. It is also extremely resistant to collapsing from pump suction and/or vacuum applications

    4.     Handling and use: Sani/Flex Odor Shield hose is abrasion and chemical-resistant. It has an outer-wrap of smooth rubber imbedded fabric to resist abrasion, ozone, seawater and common chemicals. An antibacterial additive has also been added to the outer wrap, to further reduce chances for odor-permeation

    Tech tips:

    Permeation Test

    If you suspect hose permeation may be the source of your odor issue, we suggest this simple test:  Dampen a cloth in hot water (as hot as you can safely handle).  Wrap the cloth around the suspected hose and let it cool.  Remove and sniff the cloth.  If the odor transfers to the cloth, the hoses are permeated and should be replaced.  Be sure to check all hose connections…just because one passes the test doesn’t mean other will – especially those that have the potential to trap waste.

    Hose Replacement Do’s and Don’ts

    Do plan out your hose routing carefully.  The leading cause of hose permeation is waste that is left to collect in sections of the discharge plumbing line.  Avoid any unnecessary rises or sags in the plumbing line and let gravity drain the hose as much as possible. Yes, we know… it’s a boat so when this simply isn’t possible we suggest you flush the head several times before you leave.  Replacing the effluent with only water will reduce permeation possibility significantly.

    Don’t use heat or lubricants to assist in your installation.  Sani/Flex Odor Shield is designed so those extra steps are unnecessary.  Its smooth interior makes barbed hose connections very easy to work with and its ability to bend on a 3 1/2″ radius makes it the most flexible sanitation hose on the market.

    Do make sure to use high quality stainless steel hose clamps on all hose adapters. Using fasteners that can break or corrode can lead to sewage leakage or worse – catastrophic flooding.

    Do not take any shortcuts!  Make sure all connections below the waterline and double clamped!

    Be sure to buy your marine sanitation hoses here.

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