Daily Archives: Thursday, August 25, 2016

  • Boat Toilets Professionals Will Turn You Into a Master Chef On Your Boat

    Your Boat Toilets Experts Know All the Secrets of Harvesting Seafood From Your Boat

    Raritan Engineering Company your boat toilets specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to become a master chef harvesting seafood from your boat. 

    Your boat toilets analysts help get your own delicious ingredients by learning how to harvest local seafood from your boat.

    Lobsters are supreme hiders, and I’m instructed to keep a keen eye out for the telltale sign of their long antennae, which peek out from hiding spots. Once I have one in my crosshairs, I’m to let go of the rope, dive underwater, lure the lobster out of its hole with the tickle stick and pop it in my net. 

    Although long considered one of the most edible riches of the sea, lobsters aren’t the only shellfish that are fun to catch and tasty to eat. Folks with access to a boat and a coast can harvest a bevy of delicious sea life, such as scallops, shrimp, oysters and stone crabs, pretty much anywhere like I do in Florida. 

    Loving the Lobster

    I learn that cleaning a lobster is fairly simple: hold it by the torso and twist off the tail. Before chucking the thorax and head, Doug has me snap off one of the spiny antennae and demonstrates how to insert it into the bug’s bottom to easily remove the membrane and waste track and, voila, it’s ready to prepare for dinner.

    To safely hunt lobsters, a minimum of three crew members is needed: one to run the boat, another to serve as the drag buddy and a third to spot the bugs. 

    Go to http://raritaneng.com/raritan-product-line/marine-toilets/marine-elegance/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on boat toilets and on how to harvest seafood from your boat at Raritan Engineering.

    Your boat toilets professionals know that lobsters are social creatures and prefer to live cramped together on natural shelves and holes, called “condos” by local divers, within coral and stony reefs. 

    The law requires a lobster to have a minimum 3-inch-long carapace (the part of the shell covering its torso), which means it’s old enough to have reproduced for at least one season. If it measures up, chances are that bug may be getting toasty on your grill tonight. 

    There are two lobster seasons in Florida: a mini season that runs on the final consecutive Wednesday and Thursday of each July and then an eight-month season from August 6 through March 31 the following year.

    Searching for Scallops

    Scalloping, often referred to as the “great underwater Easter egg hunt,” is an aquatic adventure suitable for all ages. All you need is standard snorkeling gear, a required dive flag, and a mesh bag in which to store your stash.

    They’re easy for novice and veteran scallop hunters alike to spot. With unmistakable fan-shaped shells and hundreds of fluorescent beady blue eyes, beguiling temptresses beckon to be caught. 

    Scalloping season in Florida runs annually from June 25 to September 24. Each person is limited to 2 gallons of scallops in the shell or 10 gallons per vessel per day.

    Clawing for Crabs

    In Florida, once scalloping season closes, the long-anticipated stone crab season rides in on its coattails. Considered by many to be one of the most heavenly delicacies of the sea, stone crabs are named for their natural environment – they usually seek shelter under big, flat stones in shallow rock piles and jetties.

    Wear heavy gloves and dive using scuba or snorkeling gear; lift up large stones or use a hook to drag the crab out; then square off in a battle with your prey. Stone crabs generally aren’t swift, so try to nab one by the elbows coming in from around each side.

    Unlike scallops, stone crab claws should not be put on ice because the meat will later stick to the shell. Instead, store them in a livewell or an empty cooler. Each person is allowed 1 gallon of claws per day, or a maximum of 2 gallons per vessel.

    The Shrimp Dip

    Although even professional shrimpers can’t accurately predict when shrimp will be most plentiful, full moons, outgoing tides, colder months, shallow, grassy flats, and areas near bridges with strong currents enhance your chances for this crustacean crusade. 

    Like much marine life, shrimp are primarily dormant during the day and rely on moving about in the darkness of night as protection from their natural predators. 

    On to the Oysters

    Oysters are largely stationary mollusks, which makes harvesting them fairly simple from aboard your boat or wading in the water. 

    A single oyster can spawn 100 million eggs each year that, once fertilized underwater with sperm, form free-floating larvae, which anchor themselves to hard surfaces, frequently on the shells of other oysters, and become known as “spats,” or baby oysters. 

    Oyster shells have sharp edges, so be sure to wear heavy gloves. Using a metal, curved rake or oyster tongs, chip the oysters off the hard surface and put them in your bucket. 

    So don’t forget these wonderful types of food that you can harvest from your boat, lobster, scallops, crabs, oysters, and shrimp. Don’t miss out on this opportunity. 

    Learn more at Raritan Engineering and see how we always have more information on boat toilets and on how to harvest seafood from your boat. 

    via Harvesting Seafood From Your Boat

    #Boattoilets

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  • Electric Toilets Analysts Shares Some Easy Ways to Fight Off Getting an OCS


    Your Electric Toilets Professionals Say An OCS Isn’t The End of Your Race

    Raritan Engineering Company your electric toilets specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to recover from an OCS. 

    Your electric toilets analysts want you to refocus and follow these easy steps. It’s the ultimate bummer. The starting gun sounds. You’re in the front row and looking good. Then there’s another horn, the X flag and, after an excruciating wait, you hear your sail number on the VHF. You’re OCS, and you can kiss a good result goodbye. 

    1) Stick to the game plan. So many times your electric flush toilet experts know the frustration of being OCS causes teams to completely abandon the prestart game plan. 

    2) Work to get a clear lane. Sticking with the example above, your best opportunity to get to the left might be to clear yourself around the pin and tack back to starboard. You’ll be second row – or worse – but the separation from the boats that started properly may allow you to execute the plan. 

    3) Get out of phase (with the fleet). If neither side is favored, look to find clean air by going against the grain: sailing on port when most of the fleet is on starboard, and vice versa. Your marine toilets electric specialists understand that sailing out of phase with the fleet will create separation and allow you to sail your boat at optimum speed. 

    4) Minimize tacks. Hitting a corner is one way to reduce the number of tacks. But it’s a risky call. If you decide to be more conservative, make sure to limit your tacks to the bare minimum. Double-check your lanes and try to anticipate where boats ahead of you will tack.

    5) Boatspeed. This may seem obvious; boatspeed is always important. But it’s easy to get discouraged or distracted when looking at so many transoms. Redouble your efforts and focus. Every ounce of energy needs to go into sailing the boat fast.

    6) Focus on short-term goals. Turn your OCS into a positive. Establish short-term goals by looking one mark ahead. It can be difficult for everybody to put everything they have into hiking when it may all be for naught. 


    Your Electric Toilets Experts Help You Recover and Make It To The Finish Line

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on boat toilets and on how to recover from an OCS at Raritan Engineering.

    As those pundits at the club and your boat toilets professionals will also tell you, a race is never over till it’s over and you’ve reached the finish line.

    Agree what signals the bowman will use and especially whether he or she is calling distance sailing or distance perpendicular to the start line (see our 5 tips: bowman signals); most boats use perpendicular distance.

    Discuss with the bowman before the start how hard you want to push the line. If you are a fast boat in the fleet and there is no clearly favoured side on the beat, you can afford to hold back a little and keep the risk down. If not and you must go left, it may be worth pushing things a little harder.

    Sometimes, your no plumbing toilets analysts know that seconds before the start, you will know you’re in a bad position and are not going to get a good start however hard you fight for your gap. If you call it early enough, you can often make room to tack or duck back through the fleet and be away on port only a few lengths behind the leaders.

    If OCS boats are not being announced, then somebody on board will need to make the call – ensure you have a clear process for this before you start, so a decision can be made quickly.

    Although being disqualified is frustrating, sailing is a team game, so learn from it and bounce back – you may be able to discard that result anyway.

    If you do join in, your OCS will be counted in your overall series score. It is possible to request redress for being OCS, but unless you are confident there is clear video evidence or you have credible witnesses from other boats it will be a waste of social time for you and the jury.

    So don’t forget these simple steps in recovering from an OCS. 1) Stick to the game plan;  2) work to get a clear lane;  3) get out of phase with the fleet;  4) minimize tacks;  and 5) focus on short term goals.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on electric toilets, boat toilets, marine products, and on how to recover from an OCS.

    via Terry’s Tips: Recovering from an OCS

    via 5 tips: OCS (on course side) or over the line at the start – what should you do?

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  • High Performance Marine Parts Analysts Explore A New Fishing Trend


    Your High Performance Marine Parts Experts Show You How to Fish From a Jet Ski

    Stainless Marine your high performance marine parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to fish from a jet ski.

    Your high performance marine parts experts know that the sport of PWC fishing is exhilarating and provides its own set of unique challenges.

    Last August, Virginia native Brian Lockwood arose well before dawn, downed a cup of coffee and met up with a friend’s charter to buddy-boat 75 miles offshore. They headed to a spot in the Atlantic Ocean where the bottom contour is known as Norfolk Canyon.

    Over the course of 16 hours, Lockwood and his buddy – Capt. Pete Esgro of RockHound Charters – covered a distance of 228 miles in 3- to 5-foot seas. Esgro did it in a craft you’d expect for such a trip: a 34-foot Luhrs sport-fisher.

    Lockwood chose something from the opposite end of the spectrum – an 11-foot-8-inch Yamaha WaveRunner.

    Welcome to the intriguing sport of PWC fishing.

    From Virginia to New York, Florida to California, Australia to South Africa, a movement is afoot to forgo the Bertram, Boston Whaler or Grady-White in favor of a WaveRunner, Jet Ski or Sea-Doo. The reasons are many. For some, it’s an issue of cost.

    The modern four-stroke personal watercraft is a bargain compared to the majority of its mainstream boating alternatives; it’s inexpensive to buy, simple to trailer and easy to store.

    The Mini Battlewagon

    For Lockwood, the switch from a Grady-White to a small fleet of WaveRunners was a natural evolution. First, he used the PWC for fun. Next, it became a quick and easy choice to catch bait before the next day’s trip.

    Lockwood found an enthusiastic fabricator in Martin’s Custom Structures, which transformed a Yamaha into a craft ready for offshore adventure.

    Go to http://www.stainlessmarine.com/product-category/exhaust-manifolds-systems/exhaust-manifolds-systems-big-block-exhaust-manifolds-risers-tailpipes/ and see how you can get more information on high performance marine parts and on how to fish from a jet ski at Stainless Marine.

    “I take individuals and small groups on extreme fishing trips in the Chesapeake Bay and up to 20 miles offshore of Virginia and North Carolina,” he explains. “I now have six PWCs rigged up for fishing. Just show up ready for a fun and exhilarating experience.”

    Fishing Fever

    Despite his prowess, Lockwood and his fellow American anglers may actually be behind the curve. Your high performance marine parts professionals know that in countries like South Africa, Australia and New Zealand, personal-watercraft fishing has surged in popularity with PWC-only tournaments that regularly attract close to 150 competitors.

    Now living in Arizona, Dustin Motzouris saw the same momentum happening in his native country of South Africa and is now bringing that experience to the United States. A champion PWC racer, Motzouris also owns a fishing-boat manufacturing company in his native land.

    “In South Africa, we always have great fish stories, from getting bumped by whales to hooking and landing marlin. But the most extreme issue we have is losing big fish to huge sharks right at the ski. That gets your heart racing.”

    Gearing Up

    Though big-water stories of marlin and sharks are thrilling, those interested in giving the sport a try needn’t venture into the ocean swells or rig for battle. PWC owners have long tried to fish from their craft, heading out with little more than a rod into lakes, rivers and waterways far from the coast.

    Google “PWC fishing” or “Jet Ski fishing” and you’ll note that a surprising number of manufacturers already produce such a combination of products. For the easiest introduction, look for a combination rod-and-cooler rack like those from Kool PWC Stuff (watercraftstuff.com) or Motzouris’ own vertical Clip-on Fish Cage ($369, kommanderind.com).

    Those interested in a more permanent setup may wish to look into fish-boat-style aluminum arches. Fishmaster (fishmaster.com) offers both front and rear one-size-fits-all arches that can adjust to fit any PWC and be folded or removed for travel or storage.

    “Once you get a fully kitted PWC, the fishing experience is better and the catch rate goes way up,” Motzouris says.

    Fish On

    The appeal of PWC fishing still comes down to the same basic draw of fishing: spending time on the water, wetting a line, and trying to land the catch of the day.

    Like a lot of PWC fishermen, Lockwood also appreciates doing something different than the guy in the next boat over. The much, much bigger next boat over.

    Click here and see how Stainless Marine has more information on high performance marine parts and on how to fish from a jet ski.

    via Fishing From a Jet Ski

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  • Boat Engine Parts Specialists Strongly Recommend Winterizing Your Outboards


    Your Boat Engine Parts Experts Show You How to Survive Those Brutal Winters

    Stainless Marine your boat engine parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why it is so important to winterize your outboards.

    Your boat engine parts specialists know that boat yards winterize lots of boats in just a few weeks, so for tips to quickly store outboard engines, we went to Thurston’s Marina (thurstonsmarina.com) on Lake Winnipesaukee where they prep 150 outboards each fall against New Hampshire’s brutal winters.

    1) Your online boat parts store professionals say that to start, add fuel stabilizer, top off tanks, and run the engine in fresh water for about 10 minutes. “With the green STA-BIL, it’s easy to see when the additive makes it through all the fuel lines to the fuel filter,” says Assistant Service Manager Nicholas Thurston.

    2) Thurston then connects a 3-gallon tank directly to the motor with his winter storage blend – 50 percent gasoline with fuel stabilizer, 40 percent fogging oil plus a bit of 2-stroke oil and gas-line antifreeze – that protects the fuel system and fogs the motor in 5 minutes running time.

    3) If he uses traditional fogging oil rather than his storage blend, on a four-stroke outboard Thurston disconnects the hose that carries oily air from atop the cylinder head back to the engine air intake so he can spray fogging oil into the Positive Crankcase Ventilation valve.

    4) Your marine parts warehouse analysts know that on the lower unit, pull the lower drain plug and check for cloudy, milky or emulsified oil. Your marine boat parts experts know that indicates it’s mixed with water which will either freeze and crack the lower unit or pit and ruin steel bearings.

    5) “As long as the engine is left vertical, the water will drain out, so there’s no need to run nontoxic antifreeze through the cooling system.,” Thurston says.


    Your Boat Engine Parts Analysts Has Some Great Advice for Saltwater Boaters

    Tip: A bit of fogging oil or winterizing mix might drip out the exhaust over the winter, so put a scrap of cardboard beneath outboards stored over concrete.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine boat parts and on why it is so important to winterize your outboards at Stainless Marine.

    Advice for Saltwater Boaters

    “Flush the engine with freshwater for 20 minutes, then run Salt Away through to eat up any remaining salt” says Jim Patnaude who owns HHB Marine on New Hampshire’s seacoast.

    Fuel stabilization over the several months of non-use has to be a priority. Today’s ethanol enhanced gasoline ( E-10 ) is very susceptible to moisture as it will absorb any condensation on the inside surfaces of the fuel tank that forms when large temperature changes occur.

    This new mixture is heavier than gasoline and settles to the bottom where it proceeds to eat away at aluminum tanks starting at the welded seams. It can also strip the anodizing off the sides of the tank.

    TOP WINTERIZING TIPS

    With the popularity of 4-stroke engines over the past decade, protecting a motor with fogging oil is more important than ever because of the many steel and cast iron parts used in their construction.

    Your boat accessories online specialists know that valves, rings, and cylinder sleeves are the most prone to rust and in some motor designs, a stuck valve can be hit by a piston causing expensive damage when the engine rotates when starting.

    WINTER BOAT PROTECTION

    It is best that batteries be removed from the boat, kept charged up, and protected from the weather. A fully charged lead-acid battery will not freeze but self-discharges over time, more so when connected to an engine.

    To avoid these potential problems a concerned boat owner should ensure that his or her rig is thoroughly winterized to protect it and to avoid unexpected repairs that could show up the following spring when the boat is put in the water.

    So don’t forget these great reminders on how you can winterize your outboards. 1) First, add fuel stabilizer, top off tanks, and run the engine in fresh water for about 10 minutes;  2) connects a 3-gallon tank directly to the motor with his winter storage blend;  and 3) On the lower unit, pull the lower drain plug and check for cloudy, milky or emulsified oil.

    Stainless Marine has more information on boat engine parts, marine boat parts, boat parts online, and on why you need to winterize your outboards.

    via Winterizing Outboards

    via Why You Should Winterize Your Engine

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  • Stories of Music Book Trailer

    Explore captivating stories of music changing lives around the world. Stories of Music, a multimedia anthology, features nonfiction, poetry, original music, photography, and video by 40+ authors and artists from 11 countries. A portion of book proceeds will be donated to nonprofit organizations Hungry for Music and Music and Memory. Find out more at https://StoriesOfMusic.Com/