Daily Archives: Thursday, February 25, 2016

  • Rules of the Road Reminders From Your Marine Sanitation Device Professionals

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    Marine Sanitation Device Specialists Encourages Safe Boating

    Raritan Engineering Company your marine sanitation device experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding safe boating tips.

    Your marine sanitation device professionals know that you’ve intended to sign up for the United States Power Squadrons safe-boating course for a while now, but the kids’ soccer practice always conflicts with the dates.

    You left the dock well before dawn on an offshore trip to fish the Canyons. Your boat’s radar is working properly, but according to rule 6, Safe Speed, a vessel must be operated at a safe speed to avoid collision, with the operator taking into account visibility, traffic density, stopping distance, background lights, sea conditions, navigational hazards and the boat’s draft.

    Your marine sanitation device experts know that to get to your favorite bay, you have to run a lengthy well-marked channel. As you do, another boat approaches rapidly from the opposite direction. In this event, you should refer to rule 14, which states that two power-driven boats meeting on reciprocal courses with a risk of collision shall each alter course to starboard to pass on the port side of the other.

    Go to http://raritaneng.com/catagory-pages/sanitation-accessories/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine sanitation device and on safe boating tips at Raritan Engineering.

    You are sharking at night, anchored, when you see a larger vessel making way, approaching well off your port side. You can clearly see a red all-round light on top and a lower white light in a vertical line, another white light in the direction of outlying gear, sidelights and a stern light. This means the vessel is a fishing boat engaged in fishing other than trawling.

    While kingfishing in the Gulf of Mexico around some oil rigs, you spot a nearby commercial boat barely moving. Under Rule 3, General Definitions, any of the following conditions would qualify a vessel as restricted in maneuverability: It is engaged in laying, servicing or picking up a pipeline; it is engaged in dredging, surveying or underwater operations; it is engaged in replenishment or transferring people, provisions or cargo.

    One of the engines on your twinoutboard center console overheated, and you are idling back to the marina. As you transit the narrow channel of a coastal river, a commercial vessel comes up behind you and sounds two prolonged blasts of the horn, followed by two short blasts. This signals its intention to overtake you on your port side.

    Running to your favorite redfish hole involves crossing a congested bay with several marinas. In this situation you are required to avoid an anchored freighter with no one aboard and a sailboat underway.

    So don’t forget these situations to be aware of when maintaining safe boating. 1) You left the dock well before dawn on an offshore trip to fish the Canyons. Your boat’s radar is working properly, but according to rule 6, Safe Speed, a vessel must be operated at a safe speed to avoid collision, with the operator taking into account visibility, traffic density, stopping distance, background lights, sea conditions, navigational hazards and the boat’s draft;  and 2) during a sailfish tournament, you are trolling off Miami’s government cut when a commercial freighter comes into view, heading toward your boat on an apparent collision course. In this instance, the vessel to starboard has the right of way.

    Click here and see how Raritan Engineering has more information on marine sanitation device and on how to maintain safe boating.

    via Rules of the Road

  • Marine Boat Parts Specialists Has the Scoop on Rescue Beacon Upgrades

    Marine Boat Parts Experts Share Tips on Choosing the Right Personal Rescue Beacon

    Stainless Marine your marine boat parts professionals would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding getting the scoop on personal rescue beacons.
     
    Personal rescue beacons are increasingly finding their way into anglers’ tackle bags, and for many it’s not only for the ability of the devices to effect an emergency rescue, but also for their expanding role as communication devices.

    Spot On

    One of the first of these devices to catch on with fishermen was the SPOT Satellite GPS Messenger. Along with an SOS button (which contacts the GEOS International Emergency Response Coordination Center to initiate a rescue), this robust little package features the ability to send a couple of preconfigured emails.

    All messages arrive in a predetermined recipient’s email, and the current location is posted on a map located on findmespot.com, where the user, device and friends are all registered.

    “Because it is a communicator, people take it along and use it, whereas with a personal locator beacon, the owner may never have to use it,” says Rich Galasso, Southeast distribution manager for SPOT. 

    SPOT’s tracking feature, which updates your location on the website map, has a lot to do with its popularity.

    Your Group #24 battery box experts know that the newest iteration, SPOT GEN3 ($149.95), has the standard features, with the addition of adjustable tracking, which posts a new position every 60, 50, 30, 10, 5 or 2½ minutes, and a motion sensor that suspends tracking when the device senses it’s no longer moving, and restarts once you get going again.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on group #24 battery box and the scoop on personal rescue beacon upgrades at Stainless Marine.

    Marine Boat Parts Analyst Continues Discussion on Advances in Rescue Beacon Tech

    Enhanced communications are ­available with the SPOT Connect ($169.99), which links via Bluetooth to a smartphone or pad, from which you manage custom and ­preconfigured texts and emails. “It’s SPOT on s­teroids,” says Galasso.

    Within Reach

    Moving into the realm of ­two-way communications is DeLorme’s ­inReachSE ($299), which now has a color screen, virtual keyboard, and the ability to cache and display NOAA charts downloaded from the Earthmate App for smartphones and tablets.

    But the interactive and social ­networking is just as big of a draw.

    inReachSE also has a website component, MapShare (mapshare.delorme.com), which allows others to follow a trip through the tracking feature, and even ping the location of the device.

    As with the SPOT, a service plan is required. Annual plans start at basic SOS service for $9.95 a month, and top out at $65 a month for a full-service, four-month seasonal plan, with varying levels of feature activation ­available in between.

    No Frills

    While it’s a different class of device, even the venerable personal locator ­beacon — in particular the ResQLink+ from ACR Electronics — has taken on some aspects of a communicator, though there are notable differences in function from the DeLorme and SPOT ­devices.

    ResQLink does offer a function that allows you to test the 406 mHz emergency transmitter and the integral GPS, and send a position via text or email to yourself and up to five other recipients. To activate the modified test function and take advantage of its capabilities requires registration with an online service, 406Link.com.

    The 406Link.com account monitors and records the tests, as well as battery life remaining on your PLB.

    Standard 406Link.com service, at $39.95 a year, allows for standard self-tests (no GPS), and sends results to you and one other address. The Plus level allows for multiple recipients and GPS through-satellite tests for $59.95 a year.

     

     

    via New Advances In Personal Rescue Beacons

  • Marine Boat Parts Professionals Can Help You Protect Your Fuel System

    Marine Boat Parts Analyst Wants to Keep Your Emissions Low

    Stainless Marine your marine boat parts experts would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to protect your fuel system. 

    Your marine boat parts specialist knows that your first question might be what the heck is diurnal? We’re talking about fuel evaporative emissions that occur as a result of venting fuel-tank vapors during daily temperature changes while the engine is not even running. Emissions, yes; not engine exhaust.

    Older Boats

    You aren’t going to have to do much of anything with your existing boat until you need to replace fuel lines. There has been a gradual phase-in of requirements since 2009, and it began with the introduction of less permeable fuel hose.

    The new requirements call for hose with a maximum permeation rate of 15 grams per square meter (about a half-ounce for every 11 square feet) over a 24-hour period, a significant reduction.

    Outboard fuel hoses and primer bulbs are exposed to the sun’s ultraviolet light rays, dictating that these parts get replaced on a regular basis. With inboards, hoses out of sight are out of mind. When you replace, look for hose marked U.S. Coast Guard A-1-15.

    New Boats

    Beginning in 2009 for California and in 2011 for the rest of the United States, portable fuel tank makers and PWC manufacturers had to meet diurnal emissions requirements. For the portable fuel tank, this basically meant using new multilayer plastic formulas to reduce the fuel vapor permeability rate for the tank as well as re-engineering fill cap and vent setups on the tanks to reduce the potential for any leakage..

    Fuel hoses and primer bulbs have also been re-engineered to meet the new requirements for lower permeability. One important note in this area is that most of the hose available with pre-fitted primer bulbs is B-1-15 rated, meaning that it is not fire rated and therefore should not be used in engine compartment applications as we sometimes see.

    Your marine boat parts professional knows that as for boats, either inboard or outboard powered with built-in fuel tanks, the new fuel systems not only need to control evaporative emissions, but they also need to integrate components to control fuel spit-back associated with refueling and to ensure that fuel can’t escape via the tank vent system when the boat is fueled or stored on an incline.

    Go to http://www.stainlessmarine.com/product-category/battery-boxes-accessories/ and see how you can find more information as well as get assistance on marine boat parts and on how to protect your fuel system at Stainless Marine.

    As for fuel tanks, builders have some options. Traditional aluminum tanks are one option and will require only modification to facilitate the mounting of some needed valves.

    I had a chance to inspect some samples of new plastic tanks that are certified to meet EPA requirements at a recent industry trade show. Moeller Marine Products, for example, had its tanks on display and described its plastic tanks as “bi-layer” plastic, with the inner layer being made of nylon.

    Noticeable Differences

    On my own 2012 outboard-powered center-console, I’ve inspected the entire fuel system in the year I’ve owned it. Aside from that, about the only noticeable differences are some small air bleed vents located on the inside of the fuel-fill cap and the presence of a carbon canister under one of the seats in the transom of the boat.

    Trouble Symptoms: New Tank Effect

    The first fill-up of a new tank may cause the system to vapor-lock and shut off the fuel nozzle. If that happens, wait 10 minutes for fuel vapors to penetrate the whole system. Following that, this glitch should not reoccur.

    One thing you don’t want to do is try to get the evaporative control system bypassed or removed, or try to do that yourself. Remember too that all of the components for these systems need to be certified by the EPA and substitution with improper hoses, valves and canisters could end up causing more problems than you’ll be minimizing.

    So don’t forget these helpful points on how to protect your fuel system. 1) You aren’t going to have to do much of anything with your existing boat until you need to replace fuel lines;  2) Fuel hoses and primer bulbs have also been re-engineered to meet the new requirements for lower permeability;  and 3) The first fill-up of a new tank may cause the system to vapor-lock and shut off the fuel nozzle.

    Click here and see how Stainless Marine has more information on marine boat parts and on how to protect your fuel system.

    via Fuel System Safety Tips