Daily Archives: Friday, October 23, 2015

  • Marine Water Heater Company Talks About Why Quantum Sails Can Help You Win

    marine water heater Raritan eng

    Your Marine Water Heater Company Weekly Tip

    Raritan Engineering Company your marine water heater specialists would like to share with you these marine topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why Quantum Sails could help you win big.

    Your marine water heater experts know that five out of the top six boats in this year’s J/105 North Americans, held in San Francisco simultaneously with the 51st annual Rolex Big Boat Series at the St. Francis Yacht Club, had complete or partial Quantum inventories.

    While there was a lot of great racing in a number of classes and divisions, the J/105 North Americans caught our attention. The water courses included reaching legs, gates, and the tactical decisions about whether or not to seek current relief in the cone of Alcatraz.

    Your boat water heater experts know that Quantum Sails checked in with five of the top six J/105 skippers on the format, the competition, and what it took to win.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on boat water heater and on why Quantum Sails can help you win at Raritan Engineering.

    Phillip Laby, Godot, 6th Place — On Getting Good Starts

    Our goal was the top three, we ended up sixth, partially because there is more talent out there, and partially because we didn’t execute our starts, we didn’t get good starts on the first day.

    Your Marine Water Heater Company Has the Following Suggestions

    The key to doing well in this marine regatta was getting good starts that set you up for going in the right direction on the first leg, and knowing where you were going.

    Ryan Simmons, Blackhawk, 5th Place — On Preparation

    The goal going in was to win on the water.

    We’ve been sailing together for two years, working on different maneuvers and different settings for the boat, but once you’re out on the water sailboat racing is sailboat racing. To win that race was pretty exciting.

    Jason Woodley, Risk, 3rd Place — On Consistency

    A top-five finish was what we were trying to accomplish. We felt with the level of competition—there were 10 boats that could have won.

    We knew it was going to be a light year and we’re actually a heavy-wind boat; so we really tried to keep the sails powered up, that was our real focus with our Quantum sails.

    Jeff Littfin, Mojo, 2nd Place — On Climbing Back

    We felt like we had the boat speed as long as we minimized mistakes.

    It was disappointing that missed two races. Once the wind came in it was a pretty awesome Big Boat Series. It wasn’t too windy; it was probably one of the best weather-wise.

    Shawn Bennett, Jose Cuervo, 2015 J/105 North American Champion — On the Challenge

    What’s nice about Big Boat Series, is that there’s a different marine course every time for a new challenge, but for a North Americans, that’s a little different because you’re used to having your own racecourse. You’re not only managing your own fleet, in terms of covering them if you’re ahead, you’re also trying to manage the lay line and traffic management.On board water heater considerations should also be taken into account.

    So don’t forget these helpful experiences that show why Quantum Sails could help you win….1) Phillip Laby, Godot, 6th Place — On Getting Good Starts;  2) Ryan Simmons, Blackhawk, 5th Place — On Preparation;  and 3) Jason Woodley, Risk, 3rd Place — On Consistency.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on marine water heater, boat water heater, marine hardware and on why Quantum Sails could help you to win.

    via Quantum Sails: What it Takes to Win

    The post Marine Water Heater Company Talks About Why Quantum Sails Can Help You Win appeared first on Raritaneng.

  • Marine Water Heater Company Talks About Why Quantum Sails Can Help You Win

    marine water heater Raritan eng

    Your Marine Water Heater Company Weekly Tip

    Raritan Engineering Company your marine water heater specialists would like to share with you these marine topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why Quantum Sails could help you win big.

    Your marine water heater experts know that five out of the top six boats in this year’s J/105 North Americans, held in San Francisco simultaneously with the 51st annual Rolex Big Boat Series at the St. Francis Yacht Club, had complete or partial Quantum inventories.

    While there was a lot of great racing in a number of classes and divisions, the J/105 North Americans caught our attention. The water courses included reaching legs, gates, and the tactical decisions about whether or not to seek current relief in the cone of Alcatraz.

    Your boat water heater experts know that Quantum Sails checked in with five of the top six J/105 skippers on the format, the competition, and what it took to win.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on boat water heater and on why Quantum Sails can help you win at Raritan Engineering.

    Phillip Laby, Godot, 6th Place — On Getting Good Starts

    Our goal was the top three, we ended up sixth, partially because there is more talent out there, and partially because we didn’t execute our starts, we didn’t get good starts on the first day.

    Your Marine Water Heater Company Has the Following Suggestions

    The key to doing well in this marine regatta was getting good starts that set you up for going in the right direction on the first leg, and knowing where you were going.

    Ryan Simmons, Blackhawk, 5th Place — On Preparation

    The goal going in was to win on the water.

    We’ve been sailing together for two years, working on different maneuvers and different settings for the boat, but once you’re out on the water sailboat racing is sailboat racing. To win that race was pretty exciting.

    Jason Woodley, Risk, 3rd Place — On Consistency

    A top-five finish was what we were trying to accomplish. We felt with the level of competition—there were 10 boats that could have won.

    We knew it was going to be a light year and we’re actually a heavy-wind boat; so we really tried to keep the sails powered up, that was our real focus with our Quantum sails.

    Jeff Littfin, Mojo, 2nd Place — On Climbing Back

    We felt like we had the boat speed as long as we minimized mistakes.

    It was disappointing that missed two races. Once the wind came in it was a pretty awesome Big Boat Series. It wasn’t too windy; it was probably one of the best weather-wise.

    Shawn Bennett, Jose Cuervo, 2015 J/105 North American Champion — On the Challenge

    What’s nice about Big Boat Series, is that there’s a different marine course every time for a new challenge, but for a North Americans, that’s a little different because you’re used to having your own racecourse. You’re not only managing your own fleet, in terms of covering them if you’re ahead, you’re also trying to manage the lay line and traffic management.On board water heater considerations should also be taken into account.

    So don’t forget these helpful experiences that show why Quantum Sails could help you win….1) Phillip Laby, Godot, 6th Place — On Getting Good Starts;  2) Ryan Simmons, Blackhawk, 5th Place — On Preparation;  and 3) Jason Woodley, Risk, 3rd Place — On Consistency.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on marine water heater, boat water heater, marine hardware and on why Quantum Sails could help you to win.

    via Quantum Sails: What it Takes to Win

    The post Marine Water Heater Company Talks About Why Quantum Sails Can Help You Win appeared first on Raritaneng.

  • Marine Water Heater Company Talks About Why Quantum Sails Can Help You Win

    marine water heater Raritan eng

    Your Marine Water Heater Company Weekly Tip

    Raritan Engineering Company your marine water heater specialists would like to share with you these marine topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding why Quantum Sails could help you win big.

    Your marine water heater experts know that five out of the top six boats in this year’s J/105 North Americans, held in San Francisco simultaneously with the 51st annual Rolex Big Boat Series at the St. Francis Yacht Club, had complete or partial Quantum inventories.

    While there was a lot of great racing in a number of classes and divisions, the J/105 North Americans caught our attention. The water courses included reaching legs, gates, and the tactical decisions about whether or not to seek current relief in the cone of Alcatraz.

    Your boat water heater experts know that Quantum Sails checked in with five of the top six J/105 skippers on the format, the competition, and what it took to win.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on boat water heater and on why Quantum Sails can help you win at Raritan Engineering.

    Phillip Laby, Godot, 6th Place — On Getting Good Starts

    Our goal was the top three, we ended up sixth, partially because there is more talent out there, and partially because we didn’t execute our starts, we didn’t get good starts on the first day.

    Your Marine Water Heater Company Has the Following Suggestions

    The key to doing well in this marine regatta was getting good starts that set you up for going in the right direction on the first leg, and knowing where you were going.

    Ryan Simmons, Blackhawk, 5th Place — On Preparation

    The goal going in was to win on the water.

    We’ve been sailing together for two years, working on different maneuvers and different settings for the boat, but once you’re out on the water sailboat racing is sailboat racing. To win that race was pretty exciting.

    Jason Woodley, Risk, 3rd Place — On Consistency

    A top-five finish was what we were trying to accomplish. We felt with the level of competition—there were 10 boats that could have won.

    We knew it was going to be a light year and we’re actually a heavy-wind boat; so we really tried to keep the sails powered up, that was our real focus with our Quantum sails.

    Jeff Littfin, Mojo, 2nd Place — On Climbing Back

    We felt like we had the boat speed as long as we minimized mistakes.

    It was disappointing that missed two races. Once the wind came in it was a pretty awesome Big Boat Series. It wasn’t too windy; it was probably one of the best weather-wise.

    Shawn Bennett, Jose Cuervo, 2015 J/105 North American Champion — On the Challenge

    What’s nice about Big Boat Series, is that there’s a different marine course every time for a new challenge, but for a North Americans, that’s a little different because you’re used to having your own racecourse. You’re not only managing your own fleet, in terms of covering them if you’re ahead, you’re also trying to manage the lay line and traffic management.On board water heater considerations should also be taken into account.

    So don’t forget these helpful experiences that show why Quantum Sails could help you win….1) Phillip Laby, Godot, 6th Place — On Getting Good Starts;  2) Ryan Simmons, Blackhawk, 5th Place — On Preparation;  and 3) Jason Woodley, Risk, 3rd Place — On Consistency.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on marine water heater, boat water heater, marine hardware and on why Quantum Sails could help you to win.

    via Quantum Sails: What it Takes to Win

    The post Marine Water Heater Company Talks About Why Quantum Sails Can Help You Win appeared first on Raritaneng.

  • Marine Hardware Shares How to Get the Most From Your Backstay

    marine hardware

     

    Your Marine Hardware Company Weekly Tip.

    Raritan Engineering Company your Marine Hardware specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to get the most from your backstay.

    Your marine hardware experts know that the discussion needs to start with how mast bend and forestay sag control the power of the main and jib, respectively. There’s not much we can do to change it on the fly. The rest of the shape is built into the main and jib with luff curve and luff hollow, respectively. When the mast is straightened, it pushes that material into the sail, adding depth. When the mast is bent, it pulls the extra cloth, and thus shape, out of the sail. When it’s tightened, cloth is pulled out of the jib luff, thereby flattening the sail.

    Your marine water heater experts feel that the backstay takes advantage of luff hollow and luff curve simultaneously to depower the sails, much like an airplane lowers its wing flaps for high lift and retracts them when high lift is not required.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine water heater and on how to get the most from your backstay at Raritan Engineering.

    Because it’s not the only tool to depower the sails, it’s worth talking about the other significant controls and how they work in conjunction with the backstay. Steering is an important one.

    Easing the mainsheet certainly opens the leech, spilling power from the main. But easing the mainsheet also straightens the mast and sags the forestay, which is opposite of what the backstay does so well. It’s slight, but it does put power into both sails when you want the opposite. Depowering with the backstay is much more efficient.

    Marine Hardware Agrees With This Advice

     

    Since the leech opens and closes with adjustments to the backstay, it’s well worth a glance up at the top of the main, and re-trim if necessary. I often find that the leech opens so much, I need to tension the mainsheet in order to get some leech tension back.

    At times, a puff might be too big or hitting too quickly and frequently to keep up with backstay. In these conditions I switch to playing the mainsheet because I can react more quickly. I will still use the backstay for trends and when things are less chaotic.

    To augment the backstay, the flatter the sea state, the more mainsheet tension you can have while playing the traveler more aggressively. This technique helps keep the forestay tensioned and the mast bent, which is essentially assisting the backstay. I find this technique particularly effective with boats that have flexible masts. The choppier the water and the stiffer the mast, the less effective this is.

    To use the backstay effectively, rig tune has to be set right. I try to set the rig so that in the lulls with my backstay off, the sails are fully powered. Thus, when the puffs hit, I can tension the backstay, keep the boat under control, and keep it at a constant heel. For most boats, it’s maybe a 4-knot wind range that the backstay will cover. If the puffs are beyond what the backstay can handle, I still set the rig for the lulls.

    How do you know if you’ve overdone it with your backstay tension? Easy: If your overbend wrinkles become too extensive, you have too much. Overbend wrinkles are creases in the mainsail that start from the mast, usually just below the spreaders, and head toward the clew.

    So don’t forget these helpful points on how to get the most from your backstay….the backstay takes advantage of luff hollow and luff curve simultaneously to depower the sails, it’s worth talking about the other significant controls and how they work in conjunction with the backstay, and to use the backstay effectively, rig tune has to be set right.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on marine hardware, marine water heater, boat water heater, and how to get the most from your backstay.

    via Getting the Most From Your Backstay

    The post Marine Hardware Shares How to Get the Most From Your Backstay appeared first on Raritaneng.

  • Marine Hardware Shares How to Get the Most From Your Backstay

    marine hardware

     

    Your Marine Hardware Company Weekly Tip.

    Raritan Engineering Company your Marine Hardware specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to get the most from your backstay.

    Your marine hardware experts know that the discussion needs to start with how mast bend and forestay sag control the power of the main and jib, respectively. There’s not much we can do to change it on the fly. The rest of the shape is built into the main and jib with luff curve and luff hollow, respectively. When the mast is straightened, it pushes that material into the sail, adding depth. When the mast is bent, it pulls the extra cloth, and thus shape, out of the sail. When it’s tightened, cloth is pulled out of the jib luff, thereby flattening the sail.

    Your marine water heater experts feel that the backstay takes advantage of luff hollow and luff curve simultaneously to depower the sails, much like an airplane lowers its wing flaps for high lift and retracts them when high lift is not required.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine water heater and on how to get the most from your backstay at Raritan Engineering.

    Because it’s not the only tool to depower the sails, it’s worth talking about the other significant controls and how they work in conjunction with the backstay. Steering is an important one.

    Easing the mainsheet certainly opens the leech, spilling power from the main. But easing the mainsheet also straightens the mast and sags the forestay, which is opposite of what the backstay does so well. It’s slight, but it does put power into both sails when you want the opposite. Depowering with the backstay is much more efficient.

    Marine Hardware Agrees With This Advice

    Since the leech opens and closes with adjustments to the backstay, it’s well worth a glance up at the top of the main, and re-trim if necessary. I often find that the leech opens so much, I need to tension the mainsheet in order to get some leech tension back.

    At times, a puff might be too big or hitting too quickly and frequently to keep up with backstay. In these conditions I switch to playing the mainsheet because I can react more quickly. I will still use the backstay for trends and when things are less chaotic.

    To augment the backstay, the flatter the sea state, the more mainsheet tension you can have while playing the traveler more aggressively. This technique helps keep the forestay tensioned and the mast bent, which is essentially assisting the backstay. I find this technique particularly effective with boats that have flexible masts. The choppier the water and the stiffer the mast, the less effective this is.

    To use the backstay effectively, rig tune has to be set right. I try to set the rig so that in the lulls with my backstay off, the sails are fully powered. Thus, when the puffs hit, I can tension the backstay, keep the boat under control, and keep it at a constant heel. For most boats, it’s maybe a 4-knot wind range that the backstay will cover. If the puffs are beyond what the backstay can handle, I still set the rig for the lulls.

    How do you know if you’ve overdone it with your backstay tension? Easy: If your overbend wrinkles become too extensive, you have too much. Overbend wrinkles are creases in the mainsail that start from the mast, usually just below the spreaders, and head toward the clew.

    So don’t forget these helpful points on how to get the most from your backstay….the backstay takes advantage of luff hollow and luff curve simultaneously to depower the sails, it’s worth talking about the other significant controls and how they work in conjunction with the backstay, and to use the backstay effectively, rig tune has to be set right.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on marine hardware, marine water heater, boat water heater, and how to get the most from your backstay.

    via Getting the Most From Your Backstay

    The post Marine Hardware Shares How to Get the Most From Your Backstay appeared first on Raritaneng.

  • Marine Hardware Shares How to Get the Most From Your Backstay

    marine hardware

     

    Your Marine Hardware Company Weekly Tip.

    Raritan Engineering Company your Marine Hardware specialists would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding how to get the most from your backstay.

    Your marine hardware experts know that the discussion needs to start with how mast bend and forestay sag control the power of the main and jib, respectively. There’s not much we can do to change it on the fly. The rest of the shape is built into the main and jib with luff curve and luff hollow, respectively. When the mast is straightened, it pushes that material into the sail, adding depth. When the mast is bent, it pulls the extra cloth, and thus shape, out of the sail. When it’s tightened, cloth is pulled out of the jib luff, thereby flattening the sail.

    Your marine water heater experts feel that the backstay takes advantage of luff hollow and luff curve simultaneously to depower the sails, much like an airplane lowers its wing flaps for high lift and retracts them when high lift is not required.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on marine water heater and on how to get the most from your backstay at Raritan Engineering.

    Because it’s not the only tool to depower the sails, it’s worth talking about the other significant controls and how they work in conjunction with the backstay. Steering is an important one.

    Easing the mainsheet certainly opens the leech, spilling power from the main. But easing the mainsheet also straightens the mast and sags the forestay, which is opposite of what the backstay does so well. It’s slight, but it does put power into both sails when you want the opposite. Depowering with the backstay is much more efficient.

    Marine Hardware Agrees With This Advice

    Since the leech opens and closes with adjustments to the backstay, it’s well worth a glance up at the top of the main, and re-trim if necessary. I often find that the leech opens so much, I need to tension the mainsheet in order to get some leech tension back.

    At times, a puff might be too big or hitting too quickly and frequently to keep up with backstay. In these conditions I switch to playing the mainsheet because I can react more quickly. I will still use the backstay for trends and when things are less chaotic.

    To augment the backstay, the flatter the sea state, the more mainsheet tension you can have while playing the traveler more aggressively. This technique helps keep the forestay tensioned and the mast bent, which is essentially assisting the backstay. I find this technique particularly effective with boats that have flexible masts. The choppier the water and the stiffer the mast, the less effective this is.

    To use the backstay effectively, rig tune has to be set right. I try to set the rig so that in the lulls with my backstay off, the sails are fully powered. Thus, when the puffs hit, I can tension the backstay, keep the boat under control, and keep it at a constant heel. For most boats, it’s maybe a 4-knot wind range that the backstay will cover. If the puffs are beyond what the backstay can handle, I still set the rig for the lulls.

    How do you know if you’ve overdone it with your backstay tension? Easy: If your overbend wrinkles become too extensive, you have too much. Overbend wrinkles are creases in the mainsail that start from the mast, usually just below the spreaders, and head toward the clew.

    So don’t forget these helpful points on how to get the most from your backstay….the backstay takes advantage of luff hollow and luff curve simultaneously to depower the sails, it’s worth talking about the other significant controls and how they work in conjunction with the backstay, and to use the backstay effectively, rig tune has to be set right.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on marine hardware, marine water heater, boat water heater, and how to get the most from your backstay.

    via Getting the Most From Your Backstay

    The post Marine Hardware Shares How to Get the Most From Your Backstay appeared first on Raritaneng.

  • Boat Cleaning Products Tip When Sailing Around Multiple Boats

    boat cleaning products Ga6vfi

    Boat Cleaning Products Is Happy to Pass This On

    Raritan Engineering Company specializing in Boat Cleaning Products would like to share with you these topics we thought would be of interest to you this month regarding safety when sailing around multiple boats.

    When you meet up with another boat in open water, well away from any marks or other boats, applying the rules is usually quite straightforward; the rules are written for pairs of boats. So when an incident involves two boats, you have to consider only the rules that apply for those two boats. But when there are three boats close to one another, things get more complex because you must consider the rules that apply for each pair of boats. For a three-boat incident, there are three pairs of boats; for a four-boat incident, there are six pairs.

    Let’s consider what, at first glance, seems to be a very simple three-boat incident. The diagram shows Luke, Molly and Willie on starboard tack on a downwind leg. The boats are lightweight one-design boats, each sailing the course that maximizes its Velocity Made Good to the leeward mark. They are nearing the “jibe line” to the mark — if they sail past that line before jibing, as Willie and Molly do at Position 3, then their VMG to the mark will be slower than it would be if they jibe before reaching the line. The jibe lines on a run work like laylines on a beat to windward. If you sail past one of them, generally it will mean that you arrive at the mark later than a boat that sails to the mark without crossing one of them.

    We’ll examine how the rules apply at each position shown. Because the boats are on the same tack, either Rule 11 or Rule 12 always applies to each of the three possible pairs of boats (Luke-Molly, Luke-Willie and Molly-Willie). The boats don’t change course during the incident, so Rule 16.1 does not apply. When right of way changes, Rule 15 must be considered. So far, so good. These rules are easy to apply, even though there are more pairs than in a two-boat incident. However, Rules 17 and 19.2(b), both of which must be considered for Luke, Molly and Willie, add more complexity.

    At Position 1, Molly and Luke are overlapped, and each of them is clear astern of Willie. So, Rule 12 gives Willie right of way over Molly and Luke, and Rule 11 gives Luke right of way over Molly. I will assume that before Position 1, Luke was clear astern of Molly, and that when he became overlapped with her, the distance between their boats was less than two hull lengths. Therefore, Rule 17 applies, and it requires Luke not to sail above his proper course.

    You can find more information as well as get assistance on sewage treatment plants as well as other important safety rules at Raritan Engineering.

    Willie has right of way over both Molly and Luke, so Willie is an ­obstruction to them (see the definition of “obstruction” in the rulebook). Molly is between Luke and Willie, and both Luke and Molly are sailing courses to pass to leeward of Willie. For these reasons, Rule 19.2(b) applies and requires Luke to give Molly room between him and Willie. Luke is not sailing above his proper course, and is sailing a course that allows Molly room to pass to leeward of Willie. So everyone is complying with all the applicable rules.

    Boat Cleaning Products Rules To Live By

    Let’s move on to Position 2. At this time, Molly and Luke have managed to gain on Willie, and an overlap begins between Molly and Willie. At that moment, several changes occur: (1) When Molly becomes overlapped with Willie, she is between Luke and Willie and overlapped with each of them. Thus, according to the definition of “overlap,” Luke also becomes overlapped with Willie. (2) Willie is then a windward boat to both Molly and Luke, so Rule 11 is “on,” Rule 12 is “off,” and Willie must now keep clear of both Molly and Luke.

    (3) When Molly and Luke acquired right of way over Willie, Rule 15 applied. It applied “initially” — i.e., for only a few seconds, during which time it required both of them to give Willie room to fulfill his new obligation to keep clear of them. (4) The distances between Willie and Molly and between Willie and Luke are both less than two hull lengths, and therefore Rule 17 applies to both Molly and Luke with respect to Willie. It requires each of them to sail no higher than their proper course while they remain on starboard tack within two lengths of Willie and continue to have a leeward overlap on him.

    (5) Finally, because it’s now Luke who has right of way over both Molly and Willie, Willie is no longer an obstruction, and Luke has become an obstruction to Molly and Willie. Rule 19.2(b) continues to apply, but now it requires Willie to give room to Molly to sail in the space between Willie and Luke.

    OK, moving on again, consider Position 3. The relative positions of the boats have not changed. However, Luke has just reached the jibe line to the leeward mark. If Luke continues on starboard tack across the jibe line, he will break Rule 17. This is so because he will arrive at the leeward mark sooner if he jibes at Position 3 than he will if he continues to sail past the jibe line before jibing. Therefore, Luke’s proper course at Position 3 is to immediately bear off and jibe, and if he fails to do so and instead crosses the jibe line, he will be sailing above his proper course.

    One might ask whether Molly also broke Rule 17, about a length before Position 3, when she sailed across the jibe line. The answer is no. The reasoning is as follows: At that time, Rule 17, as it applied to Molly and Willie, required Molly not to sail above her proper course, which was the course she would sail to finish as soon as possible in the absence of Willie. However, even if Willie were absent, Luke would still be present to leeward of Molly, and she would not have borne off and jibed into Luke’s path, as that would have caused her to break Rule 11 and then Rule 10. So, even after she crossed the jibe line, Molly’s proper course was not to bear off and jibe until Luke had done so. If Luke did bear off and jibe at Position 3, then Molly also would have been required to do the same immediately after Luke.

    Raritan Engineering has more information on boat cleaning products,sewage treatment plants,marine sanitation device, and sailing around multiple boats.

    via Rules: Incidents Involving Multiple Boats

     

    The post Boat Cleaning Products Tip When Sailing Around Multiple Boats appeared first on Raritaneng.